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Tuesday Walk: Hari Raya Haji - 13 Aug

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Tuesday Walk : Hari Raya Haji - 13 Aug
Price : $75 / ticket

For the majority of Singaporeans, Hari Raya Haji spells “public holiday.” But for the Muslim community, it is much more. It’s their second biggest festival. Also known as Eid-Al-Adha — the Festival of Sacrifice — Hari Raya Haji marks the end of the “hajj,” the annual Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia. 

Every year, 2 to 3 million people from every corner of the world make the journey. The pilgrimage is one of the five pillars of Islam that all Muslims who are able, are expected to complete at least once in their lifetimes. What is the significance of Hari Raya Haji and the rituals that take place? Why did Kampong Glam become a “Hajj hub” in the 19th century — a point of departure for pilgrims from all over Southeast Asia? 

Discover the answers to these questions and more on our Kampong Glam tour. Our route will first take us to Jalan Kubor, one of Singapore’s oldest Muslim cemeteries, dating back to the 1820s. We will visit the old burial grounds of Malay princes and learn about the significance of the “keramat” (shrine). We will also discuss the Malabar Muslim Community, discover one of the oldest surviving local madrasahs (Islamic school), and visit the impressive Masjid Sultan, the most significant and important mosque in Singapore. In the cool ambience of the nearby Malay Heritage Centre (the former Istana or Sultan’s Palace), you will delight in the colourful, at times even romantic, history, heritage and culture of Singapore's Malay community. 

We’ll also uncover what made the residents of the adjacent Gedung Kuning (the Yellow Mansion) rich and famous. After a refreshing stop for local coffee and kueh (cakes), we'll walk through the streets and lanes as your guide shares stories about the Javanese, Sumatran, Arab, Chinese and Indian communities who all left their mark in different and fascinating ways. We will end our tour by exploring a little gem of a mosque, and one of the few founded by a woman — the Masjid Hajjah Fatimah — which has survived despite the redevelopment of the area.